Pipe Smoking and the Creative Arts

Recently I was looking through some files of vintage images, keeping an eye out for pipe smokers, when it became clear that almost every pipe smoker image I came across seemed to be of a famous literary figure. Dig further and the archives are full of examples of the very peak of human endeavour, all merrily smoking pipes. Be they explorers, writers, artists, actors, philosophers or world leaders there is one thing in common – the tobacco pipe.
And this ties in closely with an article I am soon to publish on social media which only slightly tongue in cheek questioned whether the poor state of world affairs and the high levels of stress we all seem to acknowledge exist today could in part be due to a more and more tobacco free world (http://spectator.org/where-theres-no-smoke/). There is certainly a time correlation between the apparent global state of affairs and the negative targeting of tobacco…
I’ll leave it to each of us to decide for ourselves, but while we’re doing so spark up your favourite pipe and take a look at these images of some of the finest writers of our time and wonder if they would have written what they did without the contemplative aid of tobacco…

 

AA Milne

Alan Alexander “A. A.” Milne (18 January 1882 – 31 January 1956) was an English author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh and for various poems. Milne was a noted writer, primarily as a playwright, before the huge success of Pooh overshadowed all his previous work. Milne served in both World Wars, joining the British Army in World War I, and was a captain of the British Home Guard in World War II.

 

Albert Camus

Albert Camus (7 November 1913 – 4 January 1960) was a French-Algerian philosopher, author, and journalist. His views contributed to the rise of the philosophy known as absurdism. He wrote in his essay The Rebel that his whole life was devoted to opposing the philosophy of nihilism while still delving deeply into individual freedom. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1957 (the second youngest person ever to win the prize, after Rudyard Kipling).

 

Arthur Miller

Arthur Asher Miller (October 17, 1915 – February 10, 2005) was a prolific American playwright, essayist, and prominent figure in twentieth-century American theatre. Among his most popular plays are All My Sons (1947), Death of a Salesman (1949), The Crucible (1953) and A View from the Bridge (1955, revised 1956). He also wrote several screenplays and was most noted for his work on The Misfits (1961). The drama Death of a Salesman is often numbered on the short list of finest American plays in the 20th century alongside Long Day’s Journey into Night and A Streetcar Named Desire.

 

Carl Sandburg

Carl Sandburg (January 6, 1878 – July 22, 1967) was an American poet, writer, and editor who won three Pulitzer Prizes: two for his poetry and one for his biography of Abraham Lincoln. During his lifetime, Sandburg was widely regarded as “a major figure in contemporary literature”, especially for volumes of his collected verse, including Chicago Poems (1916), Cornhuskers (1918), and Smoke and Steel (1920). He enjoyed “unrivaled appeal as a poet in his day, perhaps because the breadth of his experiences connected him with so many strands of American life”, and at his death in 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson observed that “Carl Sandburg was more than the voice of America, more than the poet of its strength and genius. He was America.”

 

CS Lewis

Clive Staples (C.S.) Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963) was a British novelist, poet, academic, medievalist, literary critic, essayist, lay theologian, broadcaster, lecturer, and Christian apologist. He held academic positions at both Oxford University (Magdalen College), 1925–54, and Cambridge University (Magdalene College), 1954–63. He is best known for his fictional work, especially The Screwtape LettersThe Chronicles of Narnia, and The Space Trilogy, and for his non-fiction Christian apologetics, such as Mere ChristianityMiracles, and The Problem of Pain.

 

Dr Seuss

Theodor Seuss Geisel (March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991) was an American writer and illustrator best known for authoring popular children’s books under the pen name Dr. Seuss. His work includes several of the most popular children’s books of all time, selling over 600 million copies and being translated into more than 20 languages by the time of his death.

 

Georges Simenon

Georges Joseph Christian Simenon (13 February 1903 – 4 September 1989) was a Belgian writer. A prolific author who published nearly 500 novels and numerous short works, Simenon is best known as the creator of the fictional detective Jules Maigret.

 

Gunter Grass

Günter Wilhelm Grass (16 October 1927 – 13 April 2015) was a Kashubian-German novelist, poet, playwright, illustrator, graphic artist, sculptor, and recipient of the 1999 Nobel Prize in Literature.

 

Hunter S Thompson

Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author, and the founder of the gonzo journalism movement. Born in Louisville, Kentucky, to a middle-class family, Thompson had a turbulent youth after the death of his father left the family in poverty. He was unable to formally finish high school as he was incarcerated for 60 days after abetting a robbery. He subsequently joined the United States Air Force before moving into journalism. He traveled frequently, including stints in California, Puerto Rico, and Brazil, before settling in Aspen, Colorado, in the early 1960s.

 

Jack Kerouac

Jack Kerouac (born Jean-Louis Lebris de Kérouac; March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist and poet.  He is considered a literary iconoclast and, alongside William S. Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg, a pioneer of the Beat Generation. Kerouac is recognized for his method of spontaneous prose. Thematically, his work covers topics such as Catholic spirituality, jazz, promiscuity, Buddhism, drugs, poverty, and travel. He became an underground celebrity and, with other beats, a progenitor of the hippie movement, although he remained antagonistic toward some of its politically radical elements.

 

John Steinbeck

John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was an American author of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books, and five collections of short stories. He is widely known for the comic novels Tortilla Flat (1935) and Cannery Row (1945), the multi-generation epic East of Eden (1952), and the novellas Of Mice and Men (1937) and The Red Pony (1937). The Pulitzer Prize-winning The Grapes of Wrath (1939) is considered Steinbeck’s masterpiece and part of the American literary canon. In the first 75 years since it was published, it sold 14 million copies.

 

JP Sartre

Jean-Paul-Charles-Aymard Sartre (21 June 1905 – 15 April 1980) was a French philosopher, playwright, novelist, political activist, biographer, and literary critic. He was one of the key figures in the philosophy of existentialism and phenomenology, and one of the leading figures in 20th-century French philosophy and Marxism. His work has also influenced sociology, critical theory, post-colonial theory, and literary studies, and continues to influence these disciplines.

 

JRR Tolkien

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE, FRSL (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973), known professionally as J. R. R. Tolkien, was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor who is best known as the author of the classic high-fantasy works The HobbitThe Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion.

 

Mark Twain

Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. Among his writings are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), the latter often called “The Great American Novel”.

 

Rudyard Kipling

Joseph Rudyard Kipling (30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936) was an English journalist, short-story writer, poet, and novelist.  Kipling’s works of fiction include The Jungle Book (1894), Kim (1901), and many short stories, including The Man Who Would Be King (1888). His poems include “Mandalay” (1890), “Gunga Din” (1890), “The Gods of the Copybook Headings” (1919), “The White Man’s Burden” (1899), and “If—” (1910). He is regarded as a major innovator in the art of the short story; his children’s books are classics of children’s literature; and one critic described his work as exhibiting “a versatile and luminous narrative gift”.

 

Saul Bellow

Saul Bellow (10 June 1915 – 5 April 2005) was a Canadian-American writer. For his literary work, Bellow was awarded the Pulitzer Prize, the Nobel Prize for Literature, and the National Medal of Arts. He is the only writer to win the National Book Award for Fiction three times and he received the National Book Foundation’s lifetime Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters in 1990.

 

Sean O'Casey

Seán O’Casey (born John Casey, 30 March 1880 – 18 September 1964) was an Irish dramatist and memoirist. A committed socialist, he was the first Irish playwright of note to write about the Dublin working classes.

 

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle KStJ, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a British writer and physician, most noted for creating the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes and writing stories about him which are generally considered milestones in the field of crime fiction.  He is also known for writing the fictional adventures of a second character he invented, Professor Challenger, and for popularising the mystery of the Mary Celeste. He was a prolific writer whose other works include fantasy and science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction and historical novels.

 

Stephen Crane

Stephen Crane (November 1, 1871 – June 5, 1900) was an American poet, novelist, and short story writer. Prolific throughout his short life, he wrote notable works in the Realist tradition as well as early examples of American Naturalism and Impressionism. He is recognized by modern critics as one of the most innovative writers of his generation.

 

SY Agnon

Shmuel Yosef Agnon (July 17, 1888 – February 17, 1970) was a Nobel Prize laureate writer and was one of the central figures of modern Hebrew fiction. In Hebrew, he is known by the acronym Shai Agnon. In English, his works are published under the name S. Y. Agnon.

 

W Faulkner

William Cuthbert Faulkner (September 25, 1897 – July 6, 1962) was an American writer and Nobel Prize laureate from Oxford, Mississippi. Faulkner wrote novels, short stories, a play, poetry, essays, and screenplays. He is primarily known for his novels and short stories set in the fictional Yoknapatawpha County, based on Lafayette County, Mississippi, where he spent most of his life.  Faulkner is one of the most celebrated writers in American literature generally and southern literature specifically. Though his work was published as early as 1919, and largely during the 1920s and 1930s, Faulkner was relatively unknown until receiving the 1949 Nobel Prize in Literature, for which he became the only Mississippi-born winner. Two of his works, A Fable (1954) and his last novel The Reivers (1962), won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. In 1998, the Modern Library ranked his 1929 novel The Sound and the Fury sixth on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century; also on the list were As I Lay Dying (1930) and Light in August (1932). Absalom, Absalom! (1936) is often included on similar lists.

 

WS Maugham

William Somerset Maugham CH (25 January 1874 – 16 December 1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s.

Not a bad role call is it…?

Happy Puffing!

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6 Responses to Pipe Smoking and the Creative Arts

  1. avatar JAFH5d2 says:

    Some really nice stuff on this web site , I like it.

  2. avatar Dr Phillip Brown says:

    Excellent list – which of course goes on and on – e.g. W.H. Davies, Bertrand Russell, Pablo Casals, Andres Segovia, Albert Einstein…. And please note: all the good guys in The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings smoke pipes!

  3. avatar Brian. J. Tomkns says:

    Love:- My pipe and my dog

  4. avatar Sarmad osmany says:

    I have smoked a pipe since the age of 20. Recently I retired as a judge of the Pakistan Supreme Court. I have enjoyed all my smoking years and still carry on.

  5. avatar Trevor Wright says:

    Fabulous article Marcus. Great research!!! Loved it.
    Most of us know Bach as a music composer. But he also wrote some verse, including the intriguing one, where he explains how smoking his pipe makes him contemplate higher things.
    The last verse

    Thus o’er my pipe in contemplation

    Of such things – I can constantly

    Indulge in fruitful meditation,

    And so, puffing contentedly,

    On land, at sea, at home, abroad,

    I smoke my pipe and worship God.

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